Skip to main content

About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
FOXNEWS 60
CSPAN 49
CNN 36
WHUT (Howard University Television) 18
CSPAN2 17
MSNBC 16
KQED (PBS) 12
WETA 10
WMPT (PBS) 7
KRCB (PBS) 5
KPIX (CBS) 4
KCSM (PBS) 3
KGO (ABC) 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
WBAL (NBC) 3
KNTV (NBC) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 259
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 260 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> hello everyone. welcome to our special coverage of the events in japan. >> welcome. >> here are the top stories of this hour. workers at the fukushima nuclear plant are scrambling to save the reactors from a meltdown following last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami. in libya, the government says its supporters are making gains at the expense of rivals. the u.n. secretary general urges all sidein the conflict to cause a ceasefire. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> nuclear experts in japan are still battling to prevent a meltdown at the fukushima power plant. concerns are growing about a pool holding spent nuclear fuel at the reactor complex. workers are using all means possible to cool the reactors that were damaged in the earthquake. the plant had to be evacuated temporarily at one point due to high levels of radiation. >> dense clouds of stream rose from the fukushima nuclear plant on wednesday. but the fire in reactor four was of less concern to the authorities than a possible fracture to the containment vessel of reactor three. p
by spiking radiation levels. japan doubled the number of workers heading into the plant to assess the situation. all this time, the japanese had been telling people to stay 12 miles away, but that may not be far enough. >> american citizens in japan evacuate, those american citizens within a 50-mile radius of the reactors evacuate from that area. this is the same advice that the nrc would give if this incident were taking place in thenit uni states. >> how u.s. military pilots are not being allowed within that radius of the plant except for the ones who are going to assist in some relief missions. they are getting those iodine tablets. as the white house delivers the urgent message to get away, france and australia are telling their folks to get out of japan all together. steven chu told congress he can't say whether japan is responding appropriately because even he is hearing conflicting reports. the head of the nuclear regul regulatory commission -- nbc bay area news. >> thank you very much. >>> a bay area woman knows firsthand what it's like to survive a nuclear disaster. jodi
jones industrial average was up 150 points on signs japan could be getting the upper hand and he cuts it down to size and the news breaks he is saying he will threaten his people and then trade is fighting out, some cutting out, and others back in, so it finishes up 160 points so they dismiss the crazy guy for now. if you needed the prove, the forces are alive and well at wall and broad. but who wins? the one trying to contain the nuclear menace or the other being a many nasa. and what do you say? >>guest: we are at a crossroads and we are in a global economy. it is amazing 24 slash -- 24/7, and everyone is happy with the nuclear contains and muammar qaddafi comes out and stocks fall apart so we don't know from minute to minute or day-to-day the next headline and it makes it difficult to ride the roller coaster. >>neil: global events dictate the market. will that be the rule for a while? >>guest: it will be the rule for a long time. the foreseeable future. the two events we are talking about, were unforeseen. we were not thinking libya would fall apart six months ago or for see we hav
fan at the same time. we're also on japan and the guy who knows all important about how japan is to the financial world. joe brown, giant at ubs. the former democratic governor of virginia, doug wilder. this weekend, world coming back from the brink. we're here live saturday. >> glenn: hello, america. i want to welcome you to the "glenn beck program" and tell you tonight i'm going to lay out a theory. i have a lot of facts but i want to separate from facts from theory and you have to help figure this out. something is very wrong. it has been a busy couple of weeks for the president. there is a lot going on in the world. his job to lead the free world. what is he doing? he just carted his 60th round of golf as president. who hasn't golfed at least 60 times in the last two years? then, of course, the ncaa brackets. there is always a crisis. march madness is only once a year. today is st. patty's day. president went to capitol hill to celebrate that with congressional leaders. tomorrow, it's off for a well-deserved vacation in beautiful rio de janeiro. wow! may i just ask is he b
. "morning joe" starts right now. >> this is an international tragedy and although japan is a highly advanced economy and technologically equipped to rebuild, at this moment of crisis, it's important all of us join together in providing any help and assistance that we can in the days and months to come. >>> good morning. it is tuesday, march 15th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in washington, msnbc political analyst, pat buchanan. also the washington correspondent for bbc world news america, catty kay, and former white house chief of staff of president george w. bush, andy card in the studio with us this morning. >> we will show some of the headlines just to show -- >> big ones. >> what a big story this is. catty, you lived in japan over three years. give us your insight on some images we are seeing. >> i was there for the kobe earthquake that was in 1995. we are all focused on the nuclear crisis. all of those families who have lost somebody, lost parents, you're hearing the japanese talking in muted ways about their loss. but for japanese, who find expressing emotion in public
could lead to the comeback of the u.s. labor movement. we start with the earthquake in japan. an nbc news producer based in tokyo. i've been watching your coverage. i've been watching what you had to say about this and all i can tell you, i do see a lot of disaster movies. this looked real and very scary. what was it like? >> reporter: this happened 180 miles authority of tokyo. we felt it all the way down here in tokyo. it was so bad that i couldn't stand. you had to sort of crowd a little bit to not fall down. >> i just saw a picture. a picture looking through the windshield of a car, apparently on the streets up there. you know, i remember being through a very mild earthquake in northern california and if you're in a car you don't even feel it. i'm watching that car rocking and rolling, even in a car with shocks and tires you can see the action. you were watching -- tell me what you were doing, what you're going to remember when you tell your grandkids about today and yesterday. >> well, you know, obviously the pictures that have come through the aerial pictures of the tsunami i t
here in menlo park and in japan have updated the magnitude of the earthquake from 8.9 to 9.0. the change means the quake was 1.5 times stronger than they initially thought. the official death toll approximately 2,000 people now. >> however, the projected death toll is well over 10,000. thousands of people still remain missing while survivors are coping with emergency shelters. rescue crews are battling long distances and has destruction as they try to reach these survivors. more than 1 million people are still without water and power. nbc bay area's george kiriyama is in japan tonight, reporting live from tokyo. we will check in with him at approximately 6:15. well, the nuclear crisis in japan continues the deepen at this hour. reports of a third explosion. it happened within the last 90 minutes of the crippled fukushima daiichi power plant. the associated press reports the latest explosion was a reactor where the water levels left fuel rods exposed. they're trying to keep temperatures under control. earlier today, these pictures were taken of a hydrogen explosion in anothe
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
rundown." we will see you tomorrow. >>> and the nuclear crisis in japan worsens following an explosion at a third reactor and a fire in a fourth. high levels of radiation force 140,000 people indoors. could it happen here with a powerful earthquake off the west coast said to be overdue? we will talk to the head of california's emergency management agency. >>> and then there's libya. gadhafi's forces take the last rebel-held town west of tripoli, increasing pressure on the west to intervene. monday, secretary clinton met with opposition leaders. clinton is saturday seth to land in cairo he this hour. andrea mitchell traveling with her it is tuesday, march 15th, the ides of march. savannah is on assignment. the japan crisis weighs on the world market that at the opening bell. and saudi forces have entered bahrain there is a budget vote on capitol hill there is a fight on the right over sarah palin and general david petraeus testifies on afghanistan. that's all happening today. let's get to the run down but begin with japan and the nuclear crisis there a third explosion in four days at th
>>> right now on "andrea mitchell reports," president obama promising full support to japan as it tries to avert nuclear disaster and cope with the unfolding humanitarian crisis in wake of friday's deadly quake. this hour, can a nuclear meltdown be avoided? engineers are more troubled today than ever about that crippled nuclear react or. we talk with congressman ed markey sounding the alarm for stricter safeguards. >>> experts say the big one is coming to california. are the officials there ready. >>> in libya gadhafi forces expand strikes against rebels on the front. secretary of state hillary clinton arrives in paris to talk with european counterparts about imposing a no-fly zone. >>> labor fight. is the challenge over bargaining rights about to head to court? >>> i'm norah o'donnell live in washington. andrea is on assignment. we begin in japan where the humanitarian disaster is compounded by the potential for a nuclear nightmare. 250,000 doses of iodine are being distributed to evacuees as a defense to radiation. it follows explosions at two nuclear reactors, a third is
of the catastrophe unleashed by friday's earthquake and tsunami in japan. officials estimate the death toll could exceed 10,000, as the nation struggles with a mounting economic, nuclear, and humanitarian crisis. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have on the ground reports from several towns on japan's northeastern coast, where the search for survivors continues. >> ifill: we update the international rescue effort aimed at getting food, shelter, and medical help to victims. >> suarez: and we talk to newshour science correspondent miles o'brien and radiation expert david brenner about the state of japan's nuclear reactors. >> ifill: plus, margaret warner examines saudi arabia's military move into neighboring bahrain after a weekend of protests. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as the markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has
said about army and wikileaks that led to his resignation. >> heather: but first, japan's worst crisis since world war ii, that is how they are describing the earthquake. at this hour, the death toll is in the thousands and exact number may never be known. a powerful quake and subs consequent tsunami. the government is working frantically to prevent nuclear meltdowns. greg palkot joins us live north of tokyo from the latest on the recovery efforts. >> reporter: that japanese prime minister went on to say it's going to take the determination of people like the folks in these coastal town in northeastern japan and people throughout the region to deal with the situation. they are getting hit on all fronts. as you noted there is a nuclear catastrophe up the coast from where we are. today we saw another nuclear reactor stricken by the earthquake that hit here on friday. sea water had to be poured into the reactor to cool it down to avoid a full scale meltdown. still evacuation of the region around this nuclear reactor complex continues and the screening for radiation poisoning also continue
>> jamie: at this hour we are getting word from japan there could be a third nuclear plant in trouble there. sources are saying that the american committee in japan is reporting update that the plan may have similar plants to explosion from yesterday, partial meltdown. keep it on fox. we'll send it to washington now have a good day. >> shannon: i'm shannon bream live in washington. we begin america's news headquarters with the fox news alert. japan is reeling from what he is calling the worst crisis since world war ii. the threat of nuclear disaster is growing as they try to avert multiple meltdown in nuclear reactors. thousands are dead from the earthquake and the tsunami it caused and more than a million people are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nucle
in japan and beyond as a nation in i sis is forced to make very tough decisions. the battle for libya intensifying as rebels take a beating and government forces engage in nonstop shelling. will benghazi fall to moammar gadhafi. they are criticizing the president on not responding to issues at home and a broad. its all on "happening now." a good wednesday to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. we are here in the fox newsroom and happening right now as jon just mentioned brand-new developments in the nuclear crisis that is gripping japan and company company taourg all of our attention. emergency workers who have have now dubbed the fukushima 50 risking their lives to prevent further disaster. this after another fir fire has broken out at the nuke plant. radiation is 300 times normal. jon: the numbers today are staggering, millions across japan struggling with very little food and water. nearly half a million people there are homeless now, and some 3700 listed as dead, but that number sure will he will rise with ten thousand people still missing in one northeastern city alone. mar
radius to stay inside. we'll take a look at the difference between the u.s. recommendation and what japan is doing and saying. that's coming up later in the show. >> there is a big divide growing on that. many foreigners in japan trying to get out of the country. thousands of travelers packing tokyo's main airport. look at scene. many of them saying better safe than sorry. >> i'm worried with they are sharing about it and whether they are in control. not understanding japanese, it's a concern for me. >> i'm going home. the decision is not very clearly. so this decision is not difficult. but the situation is dangerous. so we have to leave. martha: the scramble is on to get out. several european airlines rerouted flights head for tokyo, now those travelers have to find their way to the southern part of the country. the faa say they are monitoring the situation. rick: the concern about radiation reaching the u.s. west coast. the feds are deploying radiation monitors in the area. it does not expect harmful radiation levels to reach the u.s. it posts that data on the web site. in japan the dis
inaudible] >> from the japanese media because, obviously, we're concerned about what's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i'm with a japanese newspaper. i have two questions with the tragedy in japan. i would like to ask you about your personal feelings. you went to japan last year and waves have washed away cars and houses and the japanese people are devastated. i want to ask for your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and, secondly, you touched on the possible assistance from the united states to japan. and the japanese government reports that japan asked for help from united states forces in japan. are you waiting to provide that assistance? >> the answer to the second question is, yes. i told the prime minister that we'd provide whatever assistance. i think the biggest help will be the cleanup. when you have a tsunami as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions, both in infrastructure, boats, houses, cars, that are washed into main thoroughfares and that requires heavy equipment and so any assistance that we can provide, we'll be providing. i'm heartbroken b
of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality. >> reporter: all of the uncertaint
>>> japan's nuclear crisis is literally reaching the boiling point and just 30 minutes ago, there was another powerful aftershock. we're live from tokyo. >>> and good morning to you. welcome to "mornings on 2." i'm dave clark. >> i'm tori campbell. it's tuesday, march 15. we've been following the developments from japan. just moments ago, a large aftershock hit. jana, you were on the phone with the producer. what did it feel like? >> reporter: well, i was talking with the executive producer, and just completely out of the blue, i started to hear a noise first and the desk was shaking. it's definitely been the largest aftershock that we've felt here so far. there have been at least four, possibly more that have happened, where we felt it in tokyo. but immediately after ward, i turned on the tv and they showed the lamps swaying and things like that. p was definitely a scare. >> it was a 6.2, is that correct? >> reporter: i haven't had a chance to look at it yet. but definitely large. you know, i did want to bring up one thing, earlier in the week, some of the experts were say
a the a nuclear power plant. >> the head of the u.n.'s nuclear agency is heading to japan to get more information. today the u.s. military sent two fire trucks to help battle fires at the fukushima plant. but they haven't been asked to use troops to help. meantime, japan's defense ministry decided against a proposed plan to dump water from helicopters over the badly damaged plants. radiation levels are just too high. you can see in this photo a big hole has opened in the containment vessel around the reactor, and large portions have collapsed. here is more on the plant workers who are putting their own workers putting their own lives in jeopardy to prevent a bigger catastrophe. >> reporter: they are the nameless, brave souls who volunteered or perhaps been asked to be the last line of defense. because they have specific skills and nerves of steel. five workers have already died and two are missing after the latest fire and two dozen are injured. nuclear experts say the skell ton crew are not managers, but probably technicians, men with the schematics of the plant in their head and can fix the clo
good thing; he just made it. of japan. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." as worries grow over unrest in the middle east, crude oil futures have hit again $100 a barrel in new york. buy orders increased on tuesday as market players became more concerned about future oil supplies on news that iran security forces clamped down on anti-government protesters. iran is the second largest oil producer among opec oil member countries. this e benchmark wti crude futures topped $100 a barrel in after-hours trading for the first time since last wednesday. the index is now at that price. on the new york stock exchange, share prices plunged on tuesday amid growing worries that higher oil prices may slow down the world economic recovery. the dow jones industrial average closed at 12058, down 168 points from the previous day. u.s. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has indicated america's economy is growing at a faster pace than last year but he cautions over soaring oil prices over continuing soaring prices in the arab world. >> sustained rises in the price 0 of oil and other commodities
east. libya tonight in particular. and japan. i want to lay out a case. i want to start with reverend wright. we know reverend wright. he was his reverend for 20 years. reverend wright is more than that. this is the guy who taught him and led him to jesus. i heard a speech a couple of years ago where the president said he had no understanding or appreciation really for jesus and the gospel. until he got it from reverend wright. now, reverend wright understands a collective salvation. the idea that you can't be redeemed or saved unless everyone is. and whatever you decide is true. that's fine for you. i'm not trying to preach religion to you. but i'm telling you that it's the exact opposite of what jesus taught. you can't find collective salvation in the gospel. it's nowhere to be found there are no ifs, ands or buts on that. none. individual salvation is universally accepted as the principal message of jesus christ. it's important because it's the antithesis of what jesus taught. we begin there. belief in collective salvation. the idea that you have to help others and you have to save
of the week? >>> and japan continues to try to prevent a radioactive catastrophe. among all the bad news a miraculous rescue overnight. it's all ahead here on the ktvu morning news. >>> good morning to you. welcome to tuesday. it's march 15th. i'm dave clark. >> good morning. i'm pam cook. let's get to the weather. quite a bit of rain coming our way. >>> north bay no doubt about it. rain beginning to move in. looks like some rates are moving in. highs upper 50s and low 60s especially towards the north bay where most of this system will interact. you can see right there already starting to slice through heading through the east bay and back towards san francisco. just off the san mateo coast light rain beginning to move in. here's an update on traffic with sal. >>> highway 4 to 242 you can see traffic is pretty -- i wouldn't call it light but it's not stop and go. that's the good part. so far 680 traffic looks good heading south benicia bridge. also 880 in front of the coliseum so far looks good in both directions. 6:01. back to the desk. >>> thank you. japan's prime minister went on tv t
u.s. nuclear plants. as the crisis? squaw pan deepened -- as the crisis in japan deepening, they called for the closure of the indian point power plant outside new york city. and connecticut senator joe lieberman saying we should put the brakes on building any new reactors in the u.s. so could what happened in japan happen here? and does the disaster spell the end for the nuclear power industry in the u.s.? joining the panel this week our columnist and deputy editor. kim, you have been reporting this story all week. what is the u.s. nuclear industry saying about the disaster in japan? >>> there are big differences here, paul, and it shouldn't stop nuclear power. here is why -- one of the worst things that can happen to a power plant is station black ut yo. that is the total cut of yo from the electrical grid that powerers the pump. and because the facility is so concerned they always have back up plans. the japanese had back up plans, but they were not robust enough to deal with a tsunami the size that came in. it swept away the fuel tanks that ran the back up generators. i
you tomorrow night. >> greta: tonight, just in, new and more smoke at fukushima japan's nuclear safety agency announcing smoke is rising from a building housing reactor number 2. there was an explosion at reactor 2 this week. right now the agency does not know the cause of this smoke. americans are being told to get out. state department warning citizens it is time to evacuate japan. the american government cannot guarantee it is safe. many japanese say their government has abandoned them. they have received no information and no help. one japanese mayor whose town is 12 miles from the nuclear plant says they are leaving us here to die. the situation japan is getting increasingly dangerous. it is un . people are packing to evacuate. it is so unstable the state department has begun evacuating americans on chartered flights. that first with 100 onboard departed hours allege. that's the easy evacuation. what about the americans trapped in other parts of the country? parts where roads have been ruptured by the quake and a challenge to get to? 14 buses are headed to sendai. you know about s
mallicoat. >> and i'm sydnie kohara. >>> there could be a breakthrough in japan. just moments ago, the operator of the country's crippled nuclear plant said they have almost completed a new power line that could restore electricity to the complex. >> and that could solve the crisis that has threatened a meltdown there. the 50 workers trying to keep that plant cool have been sent back in. they were forced to flee last night when radiation levels rose to dangerous levels. >> all six reactors are now experiencing problems. and 200,000 people living nearby have been forced to evacuate. randall pinkston reports. >> reporter: helicopters carrying water buckles hovered over the fukushima dai-ichi power plant. the cabinet secretary says the problems are not simple enough to be fixed by water duchess. another fire and high radiation levels temporarily forced crews to leave the complex wednesday morning. but they were ordered to return several hours later. about 50 workers have been trying to cool fuel rods to prevent a nuclear meltdown. earlier in the day white smoke was seen rising from
to "washington journal" on this wednesday, march 16, 2011. the latest from japan -- "the new york times" headline -- "second reactor may have ruptured." first, let's start with the war in afghanistan. do you think it is worth fighting? a "the washington post" abc news poll says 2/3 of americans say it is not. the numbers -- we also have a line set up for active duty military. you can also e-mail us and we are on twitter. we will read your tweets on the air this morning. this is the story in "the washington post" yesterday looking at the war in afghanistan. "the afghan war is not worth fighting, most in the u.s. say." host: what do you think? is the war in afghanistan worth fighting? do you think it has been productive so far? if you think this time for a pullout? fairfax, virginia. jack joins us. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a comment about the war and one other comment. i do not think it is worth fighting. we're spending $2 billion per week and countless companies are just taking this money. it cannot be accounted for. that is why i think the republicans are all four wards because t
concern over japan's nuclear disaster with nuclear analyst joseph sorincioni and the impact on this with economist alice rivlin and douglas holtz aiken. i'm candy crowley and this is "state of the union." coalition air strikes pounding away at gadhafi's military power and anti-government insurgents have retaken a second city. brega. there is optimistic talk of moving all the way into gadhafi's stronghold of tripoli. the rebels are back on offense. we're on the homefront of the political arena, president obama plays defense. >> the role of american forces has been limited. we are not putting any ground forces into libya. our military is providing unique capabilities at the beginning. but this is now a broad international effort. >> among those looking for explanation and a little clarity, carl levin of michigan. democratic chair of the armed services committee which holds hearings on libya this week. he joins me now. are you -- you have talked to the president frequently in your position as head of the senate arms services committee. are you fully onboard with this mission? >
of silence for the victims in japan. the u.n. is helping to coordinate the relief efforts sending in aid and rescue crews from around the world. in the town of okinahu, british and american rescue crews are searching for survivors. >> hello, can you hear me? make a noise. >> trying to access underneath what you can see. very, very difficult conditions. chances of survive val are small. >> reporter: crews continue to recover bodies from the wreckage. many times family is there to mourn loved ones. randall pinkston, cbs news, the u.n. >>> the pentagon is saying military pilots cannot go within 50 miles of the reactor and pilots flying within 70 miles are taking potassium iodide tablets. >>> amid fresh fears of radiation, governments across the world are urging their people to leave tokyo as soon as possible. so far, germany, britain, australia and france have all told their citizens to evacuate. americans are not being told to leave the country yet, though. the white house is monitoring the situation. those leaving tokyo say uncertainty about the nuclear emergency in fukushima nearly 200 m
plants. now a look at her remarks. this is about 35 minutes. the earth shook in japan. 9.0 on the richter scale and the worst earthquake to hit japan in its recorded modern history. its epicenter was about 100 kilometers earth of the city of sen day and about -- sedona and about -- sendai and north of toke tokyo. a 10 meter high tsunami wave hit the east coast of the japanese main island of hunchu and created terrible devastation. the evening of the same day the news came that in one of the reactors of the nuclear facility in fukushima one the cooling system had failed and that in the facility a fire had broken out. the japanese government declared a nuclear state of emergency. during the following days and nights many aftershocks shook the country and it continues to this day. earthquakes and tsunamis have devastated large swaths of land of japan's northeast region and entire townships were obliterated. the number of victims is increasing. day by day. and we don't know actually how many they are. too many people are still mi
will be diluted and would have only extremely minor health consequences. in japan helicopters continue dropping thousands of gallons of sea water in a continuing effort to prevent a meltdown. they're also trying to restore power to the plant so they can reactivate the cooling system. the u.s. government is now chartering airplanes to help u.s. citizens who want to leave japan because of the elevated radiation levels. the state department is offering voluntary evacuations to family members of government employees. >>> well, the fear of radiation is only adding to the daily stress faced by survivors of the earthquake and tsunami in japan. more than 450,000 people are now crammed into temporary shelters. they have no privacy and very few showers and toilets. meantime, rescue crews from around the world continue to help with the search for survivors. >> obviously you can see very, very difficult conditions. chance of survival are small but we do our best to see if we can get anybody. >> the search and rescue crews help family members looking for loved ones, but the results are often heartbreaking.
outside of japan. fears over a nuclear meltdown continue to grow. crews are racing to stop the meltdown. some say it may be too late. we turn to david piper who is in the ykoto air base west of tokyo. hey, david. >>reporter: yes, desperate measures now are being taking place in the overheating reactor in the fukushima plant 120 miles northeast of here. they are using helicopters to dump huge buckets full of water on the cooling pond of the reactor. pots of two other reactors are boiling at this time. the chairman warned there is no water left in the spent fuel of plant number four resulting in what is extremely high radiation levels. the japanese government nevertheless have no plan to expand the 12 mile exclusion zone. the u.s. ambassador to japan said the situation is deteriorating and warned citizens to leave the area or remain indoors. the state department said the u.s. government has chartered aircraft to help americans leave japan. we are also understand that any american citizen that has no money they can get a flight out from hanita airport and that allows them to get out of the
. >> i'm sarah kelly with the business news, welcome. our top stories at this hour -- in japan, the military has used wear from firefighters to cool reactors. the ieae says it has stabilized, but it could still worsen. the security council is voting on libya as the gaddafi forces push into rebel-held territory. the u.n.'s nuclear watch dog says efforts made by japan to cool reactor it's and fuel rods at the fukushima power plant have stabilized the situation but warning it could deteriorate. engineers have worked through the night to install a power line for water pumps needed to cool two reactors and a storage site for spent nuclear fuel rods. helicopters have also been dumping water on overheating reactors to stave off a meltdown. fire trucks have also joined in the effort. >> japan has been pinning a lot of its hopes on these trucks. they can get within 80 meters of the reactor. the trucks have repeatedly doused the pool with water as shown in this graphic from japanese tv. authorities were guarded about the operation's success. some reports say radiation levels have risen s
is talking about doing that. jon: thanks, carl. jenna: fox news alert out of japan, two u.s. navy ships moved out of japan due to concerns about radiation. workers at the crippled fukushima plant facing new challenges today, plumes of smoke rising from the damaged reactors forcing some workers to evacuate. the latest set back coming after engineers reported some progress in cooling the reactors and restoring power to some of the cooling systems. on top of that new concerns about the safety of food in japan. the government stopping all shipments of spinach from areas around the nuclear plants. also milk shipments also banned from nearby farms. the restrictions coming after health officials say radiation levels exceeded government safety limits, jon. jon: the grim search for victims of the disaster goes on. the scope of the tragedy climbs higher as rescue crews sift through the rubble. right now the death toll is above 8400, almost 13,000 people remain missing. amid all of the tragedy there are moments of joy. rescuers are still pulling some survivors from the wreckage. they found a teenager an
and frayed nerves. the latest from japan. how is the radiation in that country now different from what you absorb every day? and they put the squeeze on pro-democracy demonstrators and a look at where the obama administration stands. live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." i'm bret baier. the news from japan continues to be mostly bad. but there was a positive note today, as the owner of the crippled nuclear plant says the new power line is almost done that will enable the restart of electric powered pumps and possibly a solution to the overheating crisis. elevated radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true, the rods could get hotter and hotter and meltdown and shower
they're there. >> and in japan, tsunami ghost town. a study that was -- city that was once home to 10,000 abandoned by rescuers. i'll talk to one of the few people left behind. this is a special live edition of "piers morgan tonight" in new york. good evening. more and more extraordinary videos are emerging from libya today. most of them shocking in their graphic violence. they show how desperate the battle for the country has become. take a look at this. [ crowd noise ] [ gunfire ] >> cnn can't independently confirm where and when these videos were shot. our best information is that this one shows street fighting in tripoli and benghazi in recent days. as you can see, the fighting escalates from gunshots to hand-to-hand combat. we also have this very disturbing video which appears to show the bodies of an entire family killed in misurata. it was uploaded to youtube earlier today. tonight we're covering breaking news all over the globe. live reports from the very best of cnn's correspondents from the middle east to japan. >>> we begin with the crisis in libya. and two leaders head to
tonight with the breaking news on the other big story of the day, japan and here with that is my colleague anderson cooper, who is in tokyo. anderson, what's the latest and in particular from the news of the fukushima plant, there seems to be an escalating danger there this evening. >> reporter: well, there's been a clarification at least of the problem from the u.s. government who's basically said that the problem is worse than the japanese government has been letting on, has been saying this their public statements. we're just getting in new video right now of helicopters dropping water by the reactor. i'm not sure -- i can't tell if it's dropping water directly on to one of the reactors or several of the reactors or if they're just bringing water nearby that's then pumped by trucks. i would assume it's being dropped by helicopters and if that is, in fact, happening that's a very alarming development because what we learned from the u.s. government today is that some of the spent fuel rods in one of the reactors have actually been exposed that there actually is no water covering them. th
been talked -- touched by the magnitude until this disaster are closely following the events in japan and the repercussions in this country and in many other countries. before we begin, i would like to offer my sincere condolences to all of those who have been affected by the earthquake and the tsunami in japan. our hearts go out to all lead in dealing with the aftermath of these natural disasters. we are mindful of a long and difficult road they will face in recovering. we know the people of japan are resilience and strong and we have every confidence that they will come through this difficult time and move forward with resolved to rebuild their vibrant country. i believe i speak for all americans when i say that we stand together with the people of japan at this most difficult and challenging time. the nrc is a relatively small agency. we play a critical role in protecting american people and the environment when it comes to the use of nuclear materials. we have our inspectors to work full time as every nuclear plant in the country and we are proud to have world top scientists, engi
in japan? helicopter pilots in harm's way, dumping sea water. and a frantic scramble to stop a nuclear meltdown. >>> we take you inside the radiation zone, where cameras capture the panic. the mile-long line for groceries. the rush for drinkable water. and the expanding exodus that now reaches three airports in tokyo. the u.s. tells americans to evacuate the danger zone and sends in planes to get them out of japan. >>> and two exclusive interviews. tiger and trump. we go airborne with donald trump, who is sounding more like a candidate for president. >> part of the beauty of me is that i'm very rich. if i need $600 million, i can put up $600 million myself. >> and tiger tees off about his frustrations on the golf course. and the challenge of living life as a single dad. >>> and good morning, america, e on this st. patrick's day. the latest developments this morning. steam still rising from three of those nuclear reactors. one of those, worse, in fact. it shows the plant at a very critical point. and japanese officials saying, a slight radiation increase is too small to harm the people
of intervention? >>> and disaster in japan. exhausted engineers struggle to get power restored at the country's crippled nuclear reactors. in the hopes of avoiding a meltdown. meanwhile, high levels of radiation begin to show up in food in japan, as the country's prime minister urges his people to show courage in the wake of their unspeakable tragedy. we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march 19th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> new york city waking up to a sunny saturday morning. the last saturday before spring begins. welcome to "the early show." i'm rebecca jarvis. >> and i'm russ mitchell. two major stories to get to this morning. we begin with libya. this morning libyan forces loyal to moammar gadhafi entered the outskirts of benghazi in eastern libya. opposition forces shot down a warplane that was bombing the city. the warfare continues as the libyan government denies its forces atacked benghazi and said it is observing a cease-fire. president obama warned mr. gadhafi must -- >> let me be clear. these
live in japan. >>> piers, thank you very much. good evening, everyone. we're live for the next two hours from japan from here in tokyo and up in the north and all points in between. two obviously twin disasters happening at this time. we'll talk about the disaster in the north as it relates to the aftermath of the tsunami trying to get aid to survivors and the conditions are brutal. the drama of this hour occurring right now fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. a helicopter trying to drop water onto one of the reactors at the plant. that is the breaking news. a helicopter spraying water on the crippled nuclear plant. they attempted four helicopter drops. only one of the drops of water actually hit its mark. that is nowhere near what is needed. the spend fuel rods as we understand have been exposed now. there's no water covering them whatsoever. that is an extremely dangerous situation. a cloud of radioactive steam preventing earlier efforts to cover those in water. it could be critical because of a dire warning, that warning, that dire warning did not come from japanese officials
strong earth wake shakes japan setting off a tsunami warning with, partial meltdown at a reactor. showdown on capitol hill, lawmakers back in washington trying to strike a budget deal as the clock clicks down for the government again. yes, we are all here again, it's all new, "happening now." a busy way to start the week, everybody, we are so glad you are with us, i'm jenna lee. gregg: i'm greg jarrett in for jon scott. the rebels making huge gains closing in on qaddhafi's ohm town. this as international air strikes are flying for the first time. jenna: qaddhafi forces pulling back by getting bombarded by coalition air strikes. so many information coming out of that part of the world. gregg: the opposition recovering all of the ground they initially lost including control of key oil refineries. jenna: very important to watch. why the libyan leader hasn't made any appearance today, libyan television has pictures that it claims shows qaddhafi riding in a car surrounded by supporters. gregg: rick lea leventhal is ins lanuf live. how quick leer the rebels moving in the east. >> repor
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 260 (some duplicates have been removed)